How to make at home spore syringes

Materials required:

  • Spores that can be scraped typically – a spore print or a partial print
  • A shot glass
  • Timer
  • Scalpel 
  • Pressure Cooker
  • Stove pot (only if you have no pressure cooker)
  • Boiling water (only if you have no pressure cooker)
  • 1-3 empty syringes with needles and needle cover
  • Clean environment- still air box, still air room, or flow hoods are all viable options

Getting Sterile Water into the Syringe:

  1. Fill your stove pot with water and turn on high until violent boil.  The pot material is not important just try and use whatever material conducts heat the best.  Make sure the top of the water is violently boiling.  This water takes the longest to fully heat up and will be the water we are taking for our syringes.
  2. Take your syringes and prepare them with needles uncovered in a safe place.  Once you are sure the water has reached maximum temperature, flame sterilize the needle tip until it is glowing red hot.  ALWAYS flame sterilize if you can even if working with sterile needles.  When the needle is red hot it is roughly 600 degrees Fahrenheit, which is a temperature that obliterates all contaminants.  It is better to be safe than sorry.
  3. While the needle is still fresh and hot from the flame sterilization, put the needle into the boiling water and completely fill the syringe with it.  It is normal to have water in your syringe form air bubbles and prevent you from filling it completely with water.
  4. It is normal to get unwanted air bubbles in your syringe during this process, but they are easy to remove. Fill the syringe with as much water as possible then point it upwards so the bubbles rise to the top.  Simply push the plunger in and the air bubbles will be pushed out, leaving only water.  Continue filling the syringe with water and removing air bubbles until the syringe is filled completely with water.
  5. Follow these steps in order to successfully fill your syringes with spore solution water:
    • Sterilize your needle
    • Fill the syringe with boiling water, while removing air bubbles
    • Set aside for two minutes, using your timer
    • Sterilize your needle
    • Empty the syringe into the boiling water
    • Fill the syringe with boiling water again, while removing air bubbles
    • Set aside for two minutes, using your timer
    • Sterilize your needle
    • Empty the syringe into the boiling water again
    • Fill the syringe with boiling water again, while removing air bubbles
    • Sterilize your needle and cap your syringe (Question: does this melt the plastic cap??)
    • Let syringes cool at room temperature, away from direct light, for about two hours               

Putting Spores in the water

  1. Now you will want to take your full syringes, your spores, a scalpel, the shot glass, and all the cleaning supplies you use (Hand sanitizer, Isopropyl alcohol 70 percent – DON’T USE 90 percent) and bring them into your clean environment.  It is very important to note the cleaner the work area the higher rate of success you will have.  Still air room works fine but is not the best. Still air boxes are a good step up, and using a still air box in a still air room is the best option if you don’t have access to a flow hood.
  2. Properly clean all surfaces with alcohol in your work area as well as your hands and arms.  
  3. Take your shot glass, clean it with alcohol, and allow to evaporate, once evaporated take out the spores. Once spores are out work diligently to keep them from being exposed longer than needed.
  4. Flame sterilize the tip of your scalpel until it turns red hot and let it cool down.  It is important to not let the blade touch anything while it cools down and that you keep movements to a minimal to avoid air movement.  Wait 15-30 seconds for blade to cool down, because metal is so thin it won’t take too long, however if you don’t wait long enough the heat will degrade and kill your spores.  
  5. Once cooled take your spore print and scrape a small mountain of spores. If you are making 1-3 syringes it is important to note it won’t take many spores at all to ensure your solution is viable, but you can play around with the spore count on your own now. 
  6. Take your small mountain of spores and carefully drop it into your shot glass. 
  7. Squirt all the syringes you made into the shot glass, squirt at a good pressure but don’t squirt the water so hard it shoots out of your shot glass.  
  8. Once the shot glass is filled with water and spores, take your empty syringes and suck up the solution.  Squirt it back into the shot glass 3-4 times to continue to break up the spores. Be sure to flame sterilize the needle and let cool each time before you put the needle into the solution.
  9. Once your solution is nice and mixed up and you can tell spores are all throughout the solution,  refill the syringes with the solution.  Sterilize the needles again and cap them. 
  10. Store the syringes in the fridge and use them as soon as possible.  Keep them away from direct light.Before I was a vendor and had the equipment to properly make sterile spore solution I would use  this technique, and it worked pretty great.  It isn’t by any means the best method but it is cheap and easy, and I used to have syringes last me 6 months plus with this method with loads of success. 

Before I was a vendor and had the equipment to properly make sterile spore solution, I would use this technique, and it worked pretty great.  It isn’t by any means the best method, but it is cheap and easy, and I used to have syringes last me 6 months plus with this method, with loads of success.